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Croton Point Park
11 Ways to Seize the Day
...And Everything Else You Need to Know!


Croton Point Park in Croton on Hudson, NY is the Hudson River's largest peninsula... One of the Hudson Valley's richest anthropology digs... And, even has its own train station at Croton Harmon just 30 miles from NYC!

croton point park hook mountain



11 Ways to Seize the Day
at Croton Point Park...


1.) Throw a Rockin' Party. Surround yourself with great friends and incredible scenery. The open lawns on the water have picnic tables, grills, and there's a massive pavilion you can reserve. Anything more than 25 heads and you'll need a permit. Call 914-864-7075 for prices.


2.) Hike through 3 different landscapes. Swaying cattails in the marshlands. Open meadows. Dense forests... They're are all connected with easy-going trails! We did the whole thing in about 3 hours. I'm sure you can do it faster, (we just like stopping here and there to take pictures!) Walk down to the waters edge wherever you can, especially at Croton Point; it feels like you're at the ocean!


3.) Spot a Bald Eagle. Birdwatching is a rewarding experience at Croton Point Park. Bald Eagles come down from Canada and make the peninsula their winter vacation!

We were able to spot several eagles, a Red Tail Hawk, a Mockingbird, different kinds of Sparrows and Woodpeckers, a Goldenbrown Kinglet, and the Common Merganser.

croton point park birdwatching

Birdwatching at the Croton River

The guided tour was perfect for first-timers like us! (Before this, we didn't even know what pishing was!)


4.) Learn something new. Year round there is a full schedule of walks, talks, and programs at the park. Take advantage of these community resources, you won't regret it. We came for a free birdwatching walk, it was great!

The Nature Center offers excellent educational programs. Your students will identify varieties of plant life, discover life forms that live at the waters edge, examine Native American Artifacts, learn survival skills, and lots of other fun stuff! 


5.) Fly Your Remote Control Aircraft! Members of the Miniature Aircraft Association of Westchester use the airfield at Croton Point Park to fly their R/C planes and conduct training seminars for new pilots. Email info@maawrc.com with any questions. 

MAAW Vice President, Dave Londin gets ready for take off!

Photo: Ricky Flores / The Journal News



6.) Go Camping. Pitch a tent, rent a cabin, or hook up your RV. This has got to be one of the most accessible campsites to New York City. You can walk to the Croton Harmon train station and be in the Big Apple in 1 hour! Available May to October. Get pricing details here.

croton point park kayak launc


7.) Get on the Water. Navigate your kayak or canoe into Haverstraw Bay: the widest part of the Hudson!

Find the Croton Point Park boat launch on the right just past the park's office.

If you want access to the Croton River use Echo Canoe launch at the end of Veteran's Plaza in the train station parking lot. (It's not part of the park.) Drive down to the salt piles.

*Only car-top water craft like canoes and kayaks are able to launch at both sites.

(photo: nissy1121)


8.) Take a dip at the beach. In summertime it can get busy, so if you're looking for solitude avoid going on the weekends. With that said, it's a great place to take in the views at Haverstraw Bay. Open Mid June - Labor Day.


croton point park shells

9.) Find the oldest oyster shell midden on the north Atlantic Coast.

Long before Westchester County used Croton Point as a lawless dump, Native Americans left piles and piles of their day to day waste - oyster shells.

The shells date back 7,000 years!

You can find the shells in great numbers on the northern-most point behind the Nature Center called Enoch's Nose, and at Croton Point; the park's southern-most tip.

More Native American artifacts remain at the neck of Croton Point where people now fly their miniature air-crafts. The Kitchewank Tribe had built a heavily fortified stockade here, and parts of the foundation walls still exist today! The Native American Earthworks plaque marks the spot.


10.) Identify relics from the Underhill Legacy. In the 1800s Robert Underhill and his sons built an empire at Croton Point. Their brickyard, winery, orchard, and grist mill yielded a fortune. The brickyard was so productive that a village at Croton Point sprang up for the workers.

Several brick buildings from this era still stand. Find the old school house, fruit barn, and the wine vault. (I was going to tell you where these are, but isn't it more fun discovering it for yourself? )



croton point park yew tree

11.) Grab some shade at the Historic Yew Trees. Near the cabins on the southern tip are the Historic Croton Yews.

If you love cool old trees like us, check these out on your way to Teller's Point.

Yews are actually bushes and are commonly used for hedges and topiary in today's suburban yards, but when left out in the open for 150 years, like the ones here, they can grow into majestic trees similar to Hemlocks.


The plaque reads: "These four English Yews were planted by Dr. Richard Underhill in the mid 1800's when he lived here with his family. Their mansion stood nearby, overlooking the Hudson River. The Yews were purchased for thirty-seven and a 1/2 cents each from a nursery in Flushing, NY. They are now on the New York State Historic Tree Register."




History, Events, Nearby Restaurants and Lodging...


Croton Point Park History

This peculiar land jutting out into the tidal waters of the Hudson River has quite a back story. Briefly, here it is...

  • In October 1609, Henry Hudson and his crew anchored at Croton Bay after battling with the natives.
  • By the end of the 1600s the peninsula fell into the hands of Stephanus Van Cortlandt. Nearby Van Cortdlant Manor still stands to this day.
  • British troops and Washington's Continental Army used the peninsula in their military strategies during the American Revolution.
  • In the 1800s the Underhill family at Croton Point produced bricks, watermelons, and wine for New York City.
  • Vacation bungalows popped up at Croton Point Park in the early 20th century. This map from 1931 shows that there was a Merry-go-Round, Scouts Camp, Police Office, and other interesting features on the peninsula.
  • In the 1960s Westchester County used the marshes at Croton Point to dump trash. This continued until the 1980s. My father recalls a constant parade of dump trucks going over the train tracks and swarms of seagulls blotting the sky.
  • The landfill was capped in 1994/1995 and transformed into open grasslands. It has since turned into a great habitat for migratory birds.



Croton Point Park Events


Clearwater Revival Festival - Hudson River Revival is the USA's oldest music and environmental festival. Founded by Folk Singer, Environmental pioneer, and Hudson River Saviour - Pete Seeger.

This family friendly outdoors folk festival kicks off in June of each year at Croton Poin Park. Their mission is to preserve and protect the Hudson River.

In 2012 musical guests included Ani Difranco, Bela Fleck, Arlo Guthrie, Tom Chapin, and of course Mr. Seeger.

Pete Seeger On Stage
Photo: Jim, the Photographer


Hudson River Eagle Fest - Every February, when the Bald Eagle winters in the lower Hudson Valley, Teatown Lake Reservation and other organizations throw a big party at Croton Point Park!

Shake off those winter-time blues with eagle sightings, raptor shows, expert talks, and more! Don't worry about the cold, heating tents and hot cocoa are in order.

The event is free with suggested donations of $5.



Grab a Bite after the Hike!

Now there are many restaurants just a short drive from Croton Point Park, but I only want to talk about two... Umami's Cafe and The Ocean House Oyster Bar. These are both fantastic restaurants, where we've had great experiences and know the owners to be really cool, too!

At Umami Cafe try the Coconut Lime Soup, the Mac 'n Cheese Truffle, and the Rack of Ribs. We've enjoyed these on many occasions. We also love those scrumptious homemade potato chips they give us while we wait... (ask for the sweet chili dipping sauce, it's so good!)

We also highly recommend The Ocean House Oyster Bar. No doubt, this restaurant serves some of the freshest seafood in the area. It's very cute inside and out (it used to be one of those little box-car diners). We hope you enjoy it as much as we did.



Nearby Lodging

Tuck yourself into a neat little bed and breakfast. The Alexander Hamilton House is a historic Victorian Inn with river views in the village of Croton-on-Hudson. Enjoy river views, a pool, a fireplace, and even an over-sized chess board on the lawn.

Several Miles away down Rt. 9 you can enjoy a luxurious stay at the Sheraton Tarrytown Hotel, in Tarrytown New York. There's a pool, a gym, and a shuttle bus for pick ups/drop offs at the train station. Croton Point Park is just 10 or 15 minutes up the Hudson Line!



Croton Point Park Map and Directions


Park hours - Open seven days a week, 8 a.m. to dusk, year-round.

Phone: (914) 862-5290; Nature Center: (914) 862-5297; Group Picnics: (914)-864-7075

Admission: Memorial Day to Labor Day: $4 with Westchester County Park Pass; $8 without pass. Rest of the year is FREE.


View Croton Point Park in a larger map



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